Doolhof Wine Estate Launches Their New Super Premium Lemietberg Ward Wines…

Doolhof Wine Estate, in the Lemietberg Ward of the Wellington region, is a winery I have followed over the years with one of my favourite wines in their portfolio being their expressive Malbec red. Their current winemaker Gielie Beukes has now been making the wines at the estate for around five years and has just released an impressive selection of super premium single vineyard wines.

The Doolhof vineyards lie in a valley with varying aspects and differing soil types forming some interesting micro climates for single vineyard wines. The estate lies between Bain’s Kloof and the Groenberg Mountain Range. The result is soils that are finer, more balanced and deeper than in the surrounding countryside with clay content evenly distributed. A combination of Malmesbury shale, homogenic Glenrosa and Clovelly soils ensure that the vine’s roots are able to descend to four metres of depth or more.

While Doolhof has more than adequate irrigation, natural water retention is also very good, without any sign of permanent dampness. While the shape and exposure (topography) of the various parts of the Doolhof Estate allow for several distinct microclimates, generally, Doolhof experiences cooler winters and moderate summers compared with the Wellington norm.

Roughly 40 of the farm’s 380 hectares are planted to vine. Soils, growing conditions and microclimates vary considerably across this large expanse (which reaches up into Bain’s Kloof), and each grape varietal is carefully matched to its ideal terroir. The white varietals are planted on the eastern slopes of the Groenberg, which allow the grapes cooler days and less direct sunlight.

The vineyard plots around the Doolhof Wine Estate.

Their export manager Johan Fourie recently visited me in London to taste through these seriously impressive new single vineyard wines from the farm. They are certainly not cheap but then again they are very fine terroir expressions and definitely worth seeking out.

 

Doolhof Riviersteen Chenin Blanc 2017, 13 Abv.

Second vintage produced. 1600 bottles from small batch single vineyard. 2 x 500 litre and 2 x 300 litre barrels. Dusty nose of dry summer bushveld, fresh thatch, honied white peaches, quince and apple pastille fruits with a subtle high tone note of leesy blossom fragrance. A very complex, intriguing wine with rich, focused intensity, stony minerality, orange peel, crunchy apples, bright tart acidity and incredible length. Very impressive indeed.

(Wine Safari Score: 95/100 Greg Sherwood MW)

 

Doolhof Morestond Chardonnay 2017, 12 Abv.

1700 bottles from small batch single vineyard. 2 x 500 litre and 2 x 300 litre barrels. Barrel fermented, the nose is taut, restrained and dusty with lemon biscuit, vibrant lime cordial, lemon peel and white citrus with the faintest of vanilla oak spice notes. Glassy bright fresh acids, there is a real linearity to the texture, tension yet fleshiness from partial malo, toasted nuts, green apple confit and a very long vanilla pod and savoury green melon finish showing lovely verve and vigour with a pronounced saline bite.

(Wine Safari Score: 93/100 Greg Sherwood MW)

 

Doolhof Bloedklip Malbec 2016, 13.5 Abv.

Only 1200 bottles produced. Deep dark broody nose of black fruits, sappy plum, vanilla oak spice and winter black fruit compote. Plenty of fragrant lift and spice, this has a more serious structured leafy complexity supported by stony mineral tannins and a crunchy, tart acidity. Still very youthful and finding its inner balance, this should flesh out and relax and put on extra palate weight with 2 or 3 years in bottle. A fine effort for this variety that seems very at home in South Africa.

(Wine Safari Score: 93+/100 Greg Sherwood MW)

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